Norton and Avira Introduce Crypto Mining Feature – and Receive Criticism

After Norton 360, the virus scanner Avira has now also introduced a program for mining crypto currencies – the so-called crypto mining. But many users have already complained about the new features. Because while the manufacturers benefit, they bring some disadvantages at the user level.

Actually, antivirus programs like Norton 360 and Avira are supposed to protect our computers and make them faster. But the two programs of the software developer Nortonlifelock, formerly Symantec, are currently under massive criticism. After Norton, Avira has now also introduced a function for mining crypto currencies.

The software extensions “Norton Crypto” and “Avira Crypto” use the hardware resources of the users to operate crypto mining. But while Norton and Avira in particular earn money with it, the applications can even make users’ devices slower.

Cryptomining: How Norton and Avira Crypto Work

Antivirus programs such as Avira and Norton are sometimes controversial because they are not always effective. Instead, many virus scanners rely on targeted marketing strategies to generate new sources of income.

This also applies to the new crypto features of Norton 360 and Avira. However, since crypto currencies such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and Co. are not centrally managed, they rely on blockchain technology.

A decentralized network uses the computing capacity of numerous computers to manage, maintain or even mine the digital currencies. This is also the case with Norton 360 and Avira: Because the new crypto functions of the two antivirus programs should enable the mining of the cryptocurrency Ethereum.

Since the mining of crypto currencies requires a certain amount of computing power, mining with Norton and Avira Crypto only takes place when your own computer is in sleep mode, according to the manufacturer. For some computers, the new functions are also unsuitable.

Is it worth mining cryptocurrencies via Norton and Avira?

The new crypto features of Norton and Avira seem to be established by default within the software. However, users would have the opportunity to activate the programs independently and to deactivate them again.

Although the two subsidiaries of parent company Nortonlifelock Emphasize that users would also benefit financially from mining. However, this seems extremely questionable. Because even if Norton and Avira would involve their users, there would be enormous electricity costs.

In order to benefit from crypto mining, a special data center is actually required. A single private computer is unlikely to do anything about it. But true to the motto “Small cattle also make crap”, Norton and Avira in particular should benefit from the large number of their users.

Especially since, according to reports, around 15 percent of the mined coins flow to the respective company. However, although the mining features of Avira and Norton 360 are voluntary, there has been plenty of criticism.

Criticism from all sides

Unlike Norton, Avira’s virus scanner has a free version. Norton 360, on the other hand, costs around 75 euros per year in the subscription and in the basic version.

But whether users can push the price with the new crypto features and actually earn money seems extremely questionable. In times of rising electricity prices, it could even be that users even pay more, while Norton and Avira exploit their computing power and pass on the electricity costs to them.

The programs could ultimately even make the home computer slower. IT expert Chris Vickery sharply criticized Norton’s actions via Twitter, calling it “disgusting.” In an official Norton forum, numerous users have also complained.

They call on the company to protect them from crypto miners instead of installing them. In addition, the functions could not be uninstalled so easily. At least Norton is now reacting to this and showed a corresponding, albeit somewhat complicated way.

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